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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    This will be fun

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    Looks like due to hail damage I have the honors of changing this Cond. Coil. What is yalls thoughts on this job? Them power lines really throw a curve ball to the job not to mention the useless 1 foot cat walk being more dangerous than good. Just out of curiosity how much more would yalls rates go up for this job?


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,690
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    why not remove the grills one at a time and fin comb it out or is it to far gone for that to work.
    I would not work around the power feeder unless it was covered by the power company where i am they cover it free.

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  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    I agree with fin-combing it... if it is not too far gone.

    One thing... that platform was built well... like the re-enforced gussets below the platform.
    And it lower vandalism issues...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Phoenix Arizona
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    1,476
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    Crane the unit down, fix it and put it back...
    "If history repeats itself I am so getting a dinosaur"

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  7. #5
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
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    Those overhead wires are to clip your lanyard to for fall protection.

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  9. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Bridgeton, MO, 'burb of St. Louis, Mo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Those overhead wires are to clip your lanyard to for fall protection.
    You are always looking on the bright side!

    The genius of the United States Constitution - when it frustrates the government, you know it is working.

    RIP Mr. Gizmo; end of watch 10/27/16

    It was a good situation, until everything went wrong!
    Rub some dirt on it and walk it off...
    We will always know it should have worked!

    “Don't believe signature quotes.” - George Washington

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  11. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    A well thought out disaster!! In my opinion the guard posts are too small in diameter. Be very careful.

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  13. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    Thread Starter
    They are smashed pretty bad on the right side, I think I'll end up ripping more aluminum out than fixing anything.


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  14. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
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    In order to make that job safe to do, you would have to spend as much money and time (which is also money) as it would take to crane that thing down, fix it, and then crane it back up.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

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  15. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    639
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    Just my opinion: One section of rolling scaffolding would put you at the correct working hieght to comb out the coil or determ and disconnect. When I add the adjustable wheel to my scaffold the platform to stand on is 7 to 9 ft above grade. If it had to come down an equipment jack or small fork lift would work very well from the right side.

    I agree with the comment about platform around the unit, but I love the platform structure it will definitely not fall down

  16. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
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    Thread Starter
    Let me mention also that the unit sits in a 2" angle iron frame around the bottom of the unit so that covers up the fork lift holes plus makes it impossible to use a drill to get the doors off. I have to use a open end ratchet on all the bottom screws. It's really tough to service or troubleshoot anything with the design of this system and the situation it's in. They will be close to half a new system by time i work up my quote and this unit is only 2.5 years old


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  17. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    See if you can sub it out to the original installer for a firm price, then sit back and laugh while he scratches his head how to fix it.

    It really does look like the original installer was trying for a quality job but many guys never think about when it comes time to do maintenance or replacement. As you said "A Fun One" but I'm sure you can find a way to get the job done

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
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    The cost of repairs is probably covered by their insurance policy.
    “Now the freaks are on television, the freaks are in the movies. And it’s no longer the sideshow, it’s the whole show. The colorful circus and the clowns and the elephants, for all intents and purposes, are gone, and we’re dealing only with the freaks.” - Jonathan Winters

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