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Thread: txv v.s. fixed

  1. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    south carolina
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    17
    I have now time to respond: all of you are crazy...I have 20 years experience in this field,yes the txv is more efficient but an orifice is easier to service. fixed lasts...txvs' dont

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
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    I still say charging or checking the charge on a system with a TXV involves fewer steps and has far less room for interpritation and error than charging or checking the charge on a system with fixed metering.
    Hell, just look through some of the refrigerant charging discussions that have taken place on this board. For the most part, everyone has charging procedure that is different from others to one degree or another when it comes to fixed metering.
    Almost everyone will agree on how to charge a non Lennox TXV equipped system though, exept for the inbred neanderthals that still want to use a sight glass.

    TXVs are simple mechanical devices that have a very long track record of reliability. Just about every other component in an HVAC system is less reliable than a TXV. If you are finding a lot of bad TXVs, someone is is doing something wrong...

    The one and ONLY tangable benefit of fixed metering is that it is cheep. A TXV is superior in every other way.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    pembroke,NY
    Posts
    33
    I dont believe you can even use a fixed orfice with the higher seer ratings. you have to install txv. txv is definitly better for the compressor.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Texas
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    1,629

    jamessaluda


    I'll see your 20, and raise you 20.

    Anyone who picks any part of any mechanical device or
    system and states it is better, or more efficient without
    considering application is an idiot.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    What about the RHEEM/RUDD expansion valve kit that also includes an orifice? They are installed on the RCBA 10 SEER coil to match up to the 13 SEER condensing unit.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4

    What is a TXV

    Excuse my ignorance what is a TXV?, thank you

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Texas
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    With the Rheem/Ruud expansion valve kit, it is a different
    thing. The "orifice" in this case is a distribution nozzle.
    The bore size is MUCH larger than an orifice.

    Say, .89 for five ton orifice, or .157 for nozzle with TEV.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,962
    Originally posted by smadave
    Will someone please tell goodman to start using TXV's so Robo can stop embarrassing himself....


    Dave in NJ
    All Goodman systems can be fitted with easily installed TXVs. If a TXV is required for an application, you can very easily put one on any Goodman system. All TXVs for Goodman systems are mechanically installed to mount right onto the existing piston housing....no brazing required. Even the bypass tube mechanically connects to the existing schraeder port used for testing all Goodman coils.

    My point is, if a specific application does not require more control by a mechanical device that is more prone to failure; why use it? In the realm of "keep it simple", a piston makes more sense. Again; I have my own parents home as an example of an application that I thought would have benefitted from TXV control, that simply has turned out to be doing a great job using a piston. Why fix what ain't broke?
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  9. #48
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Kansas City
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    2,729
    Refrigerant charge, orifice size, airflow, equipment size, are all more critical with a fixed orifice. A fixed orifice is much more likely to become restricted, more likely to flood and damage the compressor. Txv is more efficient.
    I vote Txv.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,962
    Originally posted by rsmith46
    Refrigerant charge, orifice size, airflow, equipment size, are all more critical with a fixed orifice. A fixed orifice is much more likely to become restricted, more likely to flood and damage the compressor. Txv is more efficient.
    I vote Txv.
    Other then "txv is more efficient", I disagree with all of the rest of your post. Do you have any data to back any of that up?

    Let me start; if there is something in a system that is going to restrict a piston, it is even more likely to do damage to a TXV. What? Do you think a TXV just chomps through garbage in a system? Come on! If you got enough garbage in a system to block up any metering device, the metering device is the least of your worries.

    Just one more thing; if a piston metered system must be so much better engineered, then you are stating that Goodman systems are better engineered then the other brands that require TXVs, and that if you install the easily installed optional TXV on any Goodman system, it will automatically be superior to all of those systems out there that were hap-hazzardly designed around the use of a TXV only?

    I gotta tell you guys; I have been sick as a dog tonight and this thread is just making my day

    [Edited by RoBoTeq on 04-30-2006 at 01:29 AM]
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  11. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
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    14,915
    Robo going off the deep end?

    Most of what he said is true to one degree or another.

    The refrigerant charge is much more critical in a fixed metered system. A TXV equipped system can be slightly under or over charged, sometimes even significantly over charged, without making a significant, or even measurable difference in the performance of the system.

    While poor airflow is bad for any system, a TXV is more likely to prevent flooding of the evaperator coil and liquid refrigerant getting to the compressor than a fixed metered system. I have seen ballance port type TXVs loose control of the superheat when poor airflow is combined with other problems in the system though.

    It is a known fact that a TXV provides better protection for the compressor.

    He kinda lost me with the equipment size and more likely to become restricted parts though, lol.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,619
    Originally posted by -80guru
    No doubt about it txv rules, fixed restriction drools.
    Freezeking2000
    I could not agree more with this man!


    freeze

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,619
    Originally posted by RoBoTeq
    If TXV metering is needed for specific operational purposes, then a TXV is best for that system and should be installed.

    If piston metering is able to do the job without creating issues due to operational needs, then a piston is going to last a lot longer without troubles and should be used.

    This is like asking if slicks or knobby tires are better; it depends on the conditions.

    I DO NOT AGREE WITH YOU THIS TIME.............................................. .NO WAY YOU REALLY BELIEVE THIS.!

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