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  1. #1
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    Oct 2011
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    N.E. Indiana
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    Proving yourself.

    You hear employers say, you must prove yourself. I agee with the statement on it's face.

    However, HOW MUCH is required to satisfy you? Does a guy need to install 4, 10, or 1000 furnaces? Does a guy need to lay 100 miles of ductwork BEFORE you think he has proved himself?

    I don't mean to sound of the jerk. I am just looking for some insight. Are your expectations decent, or are they pie in the sky?

  2. #2
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    Aug 2006
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    Ohio
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    I think one month is enough to prove yourself to an employer.

    I have had employers hire me at $X.XX/hr with the promise that I would get $X.XX after proving myself. I made it clear that I would expect that pay raise after one month.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by zw17 View Post
    I think one month is enough to prove yourself to an employer.

    I have had employers hire me at $X.XX/hr with the promise that I would get $X.XX after proving myself. I made it clear that I would expect that pay raise after one month.
    Freemind: This is how not to approach the situation. Here's why: Let's say that you and I had the job interview(s) and we came to an agreement that you would go to work and I would pay you to do so. If things worked out to everyones satisfaction, I would increase your pay after one month from $3.00/hour to $3.10/hour and you agreed that the starting wage and increase was fair and good, but then you "made it clear" that you expected me to live up to what I said I would do. In other words, for no reason at all, you basically told me that you wouldn't tolerate it if I was a liar. At that point, the thing that would have been not only clear to this gentleman, but painfully obvious, was the location of the door.

    This quote and it's content is the EXACT reason that John Markl started the thread that he started originally about "What do you bring to the table?". If one wants to be shown respect, then one has to have respect. This quote shows no respect at all towards the prospective employer. It does, however, convey the typical "It's all about me" attitude that many folks carry with them into job interviews. At least that's what they say on here and that's what they think, obviously. I've conducted lots of interviews and never had anyone say anything of that sort to my face, but it's gotten back through the grapevine that they told everyone else they said something of the sort, probably to try and make themselves look like they're in control. Someone that would actually say something like this in an interview isn't worthy to work for a company with my family's name on it. How should I think he'd treat my customers if he don't think any more than that of me? Remember, this is a two way street.

  4. #4
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    Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by klove View Post
    Freemind: This is how not to approach the situation. Here's why: Let's say that you and I had the job interview(s) and we came to an agreement that you would go to work and I would pay you to do so. If things worked out to everyones satisfaction, I would increase your pay after one month from $3.00/hour to $3.10/hour and you agreed that the starting wage and increase was fair and good, but then you "made it clear" that you expected me to live up to what I said I would do. In other words, for no reason at all, you basically told me that you wouldn't tolerate it if I was a liar. At that point, the thing that would have been not only clear to this gentleman, but painfully obvious, was the location of the door.

    This quote and it's content is the EXACT reason that John Markl started the thread that he started originally about "What do you bring to the table?". If one wants to be shown respect, then one has to have respect. This quote shows no respect at all towards the prospective employer. It does, however, convey the typical "It's all about me" attitude that many folks carry with them into job interviews. At least that's what they say on here and that's what they think, obviously. I've conducted lots of interviews and never had anyone say anything of that sort to my face, but it's gotten back through the grapevine that they told everyone else they said something of the sort, probably to try and make themselves look like they're in control. Someone that would actually say something like this in an interview isn't worthy to work for a company with my family's name on it. How should I think he'd treat my customers if he don't think any more than that of me? Remember, this is a two way street.
    Typical boss talk.... I am screwing you blah blah balh.

    If you cannot put on paper that I would receive the promised raise within one month and satisfactorily "proving" myself I would find my own way to the door. You wouldn't need to worry about hiring me, you competition would.

    I have seen way too many employers promise that big raise after a "proving" period, problem is that the proving period often times turns into months where you end up busting your ass while the boss rakes in the profits of your hard work.

    Everything gets put on paper when I get hired, if you don't, see ya later. Plenty of HVAC contractors out there.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,265
    Make all things known upfront and write it down. Most companies use 90 days as a probation period. If 90 days isn't long enough then start looking around for a another company or go remind the Boss. Most Boss's don't mind being reminded as long as you are cool about it. Jump in his face or it comes through a 3rd party is where most get into trouble.

    I forget things too. The nicest way I was reminded was a note in an envelope. "Hey Boss, is my 90 days up yet? Thanks"... It was actually almost 120 so I gave him back pay.

    Just say'n

  6. #6
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    Jul 2001
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    Southern NJ
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    1,241
    It's not about time or volume of work.

    If you're making $10 an hour and you want to make $20, work like you're making $20.

    If being worth more than they pay you isn't working, you may not be at the right company.
    Ryan
    Maintenance Guy
    -----------------
    naysayer, skeptic, conspiracy theorist

  7. #7
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    Sep 2004
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    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
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    I like that!








    Quote Originally Posted by maintenanceguy View Post
    It's not about time or volume of work.

    If you're making $10 an hour and you want to make $20, work like you're making $20.

    If being worth more than they pay you isn't working, you may not be at the right company.

  8. #8
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    Dec 2008
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    Dixiana, AL
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    Quote Originally Posted by freemind View Post
    You hear employers say, you must prove yourself. I agee with the statement on it's face.

    However, HOW MUCH is required to satisfy you? Does a guy need to install 4, 10, or 1000 furnaces? Does a guy need to lay 100 miles of ductwork BEFORE you think he has proved himself?

    I don't mean to sound of the jerk. I am just looking for some insight. Are your expectations decent, or are they pie in the sky?
    Speaking pretty much about the service end of our industry, it's not quite an excercise in objectivity to see if someone is measuring up to what they need to be doing. Sure, there are objective things like is paperwork in on time and completely filled out (so that you and the company can get paid), are you taking care of the vehicle that you've been entrusted with, on time all the time unless there's a really good reason (even this is subjective 'cause we may not agree on the really good reason), etc.

    The really subjective parts are that what you think and what I think are characteristics of a good mechanic with a good attitude and good customer skills may differ greatly, in part or in whole. For example, I know a man that has as good a work ethic as anyone and he works HARD. So hard, in fact, that he creates work for himself by forgetting things or doing things wrong from trying to get so much done. Nothing wrong with the work ethic role model, but I don't want someone like that being around my customers or training the apprentices. For another, does your "get it done and done right" and my "get it done and done right" match? There's a thousand ways to get to Chicago, and I'm paying the way. Can we see eye to eye and both learn from each other, or do you get bent out of shape because I want something done differently than you'd do it, even if my way is just as good? We aren't all the same, and no employer worth his salt is going to can someone just because there are differences of opinion or he has some little quirks, as long as they're little and stay that way. But the boss not only has to look at the objective things, but the catch-all "Does he fit in well with everyone else" part. In other words, is the good chemistry that we had up until the day before he arrived still there a month later? A good company will make room for differing personalities and talents and try to play to the strengths that everyone has, unless those differences disrupt or cause things to get off course. And there's a lot of other things that go into the nutroll, but you see the direction.

    Unfortunately, in our industry we don't manufacture blue widgets and get judged solely on whether or not we make our quota of perfectly round widgets in an eight hour day, and then send them to the company owner for distribution, all without any interaction with the other folks at the company. It would be nice, but that's only in a dream. It would be great to have a list of objectives and standards to go by but that's just not possible in the real world. Some companies do, but I've always considered them to be more fluff than substance because they try to put individuals into a mold. They have a place, but the final decisions require far more than a checkmark on a page. And that's one of the reasons it's so difficult to be "The Boss".

  9. #9
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    Mar 2006
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    1,042
    my last job you were expected to come in, kiss everyone's ass, maybe a reach-around to two, ask tons of questions and act dumb to stroke there egos. and be happy cleaning up the shop everyday and running parts to people for the first 4 or 5 months.. mind you this for a tech thats been at it for 6 years. guess thats the way it is at a BIG company

  10. #10
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    Sep 2004
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    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
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    except for cleaning the shop, sounds like all jobs!!!!!!!!!!!!





    Quote Originally Posted by marter View Post
    my last job you were expected to come in, kiss everyone's ass, maybe a reach-around to two, ask tons of questions and act dumb to stroke there egos. and be happy cleaning up the shop everyday and running parts to people for the first 4 or 5 months.. mind you this for a tech thats been at it for 6 years. guess thats the way it is at a BIG company

  11. #11
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    Feb 2007
    Location
    Fremont, Indiana
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    1,706
    Quote Originally Posted by marter View Post
    my last job you were expected to come in, kiss everyone's ass, maybe a reach-around to two, ask tons of questions and act dumb to stroke there egos. and be happy cleaning up the shop everyday and running parts to people for the first 4 or 5 months.. mind you this for a tech thats been at it for 6 years. guess thats the way it is at a BIG company
    Thank God I thought I was the only one!
    Act like you are weak when you are really strong scheme is getting really old.
    Member of the "Work Exchange Program"
    "Will work for knowledge"

    "Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid"
    A Einstein

  12. #12
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    Sep 2004
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    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
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    it is like the show survivor!

    if you are out numbered by the dumb guys?

    lets say there are 12 techs

    1 smart one,
    2 better than average
    7 below average
    2 absolute idiots

    you have to get a majority of the dummies to like you

    so there are basically 9 dummies

    you have to befriend 5 of them!

    if you do not then they will be scared and run you off!

    then you can start to shine a little but whatever you do not appear smarter than the 3 top guys!!!!!!!!!!!!







    Quote Originally Posted by kamersoutdoor View Post
    Thank God I thought I was the only one!
    Act like you are weak when you are really strong scheme is getting really old.

  13. #13
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    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
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    Quote Originally Posted by supertek65 View Post
    1 smart one,
    2 better than average
    7 below average
    2 absolute idiots
    You do realize that half the people in the world are below average, don't you?

    And have you ever stopped to consider that out of approximately 7 billion people on the earth, there's only one that can truly claim the title of "average"? Things that make you go HHMMM??......

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