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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Canton ohio
    Posts
    865
    Originally posted by airworx
    trane or carrier. tranes condenser coils are extremely hard to clean and keep clean thus will probably over the life of the unit be less efficient because the coils are going to stay dirtier.
    They're easy to clean if you pop the fan off.Regular maintenance should be performed....no matter the name brand.
    Go RCR!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Originally posted by airworx
    trane or carrier. tranes condenser coils are extremely hard to clean and keep clean thus will probably over the life of the unit be less efficient because the coils are going to stay dirtier.
    I find the oposite to be true. They are extreemly easy to clean, and because of the heat transfere properties of the spine fin coil, they maintain thier performance better as they get dirty than plate fin type coil. Especially when you considder most of the plate fin type condensor coils now have very tight spin facing and/or are double row.
    The really bad ones are plate fin coils with "enhanced" fins, basicly slots cut in the fins to give them more leading edge. They tend to get very plugged up with dirt and take a lot of flushing to really get clean, even though they look very clean from the outside.

    If there are cottonwood trees in the area, spine fin coils do collect it worse than plate fin coils, but it only takes a couple of minutes with a propane torch to clear it off, then rinse the ash away with water. Only need to remove one panel.

    At least one study proved that spine fin coils maintain thier efficincy better over the life of the equipment than plate fin coils. I havn't seen it online to post a link though.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    168
    thanks again to all,

    I looked at the Copeland scroll and it's good to know that any AC/heat pump with a scroll has the capacity to run and run because that is what it will do in our area.

    Dan,
    I don't live near salt water and presently have Ruud AC. I see they use scrolls. The Ruud/Rheem heat pumps seem to have simple durable, easily serviced designs also. So, I am getting a feel for some design/brands.

    thanks,
    jb

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    2,139
    jdb52

    I personally believe Trane/AS make the best heat pumps. You should consider the rated SEER and HSPF for the size unit required for your home. Two Stg compressor with var speed blower is the way to go especially for the area you live.

    Carrier/Bryant Infinity/Evolution HPs have the best system controls especially for dehumidification.

    Both Trane/AS and Carrier/Bryant would be excellent choices and they are very quiet.

    IMO

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    168
    thanks tigerdunes,

    I've read some of your postings on the Gardenweb forum.
    As I mentioned earlier, I was a little hesitant to ask about brands, but recommendations toward Trane/AS for the heat pump itself are noticeable.

    We are expected to break heat records today in West Texas. Our forecast is for 99. Old record was for 95.

    jb

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    168
    If I could turn the thread in a different direction by asking another question.

    Especially to those of you who answered me from Texas or the DFW Metroplex (mark, airworx, aircooled, gas 1) or anyone else who wants to help,

    As you know, we will hit record heat today, so early in the season. I am about 150 miles west of FW, Abilene. Our humidity concerns exist but heat load is more from sensible gain. I think that sizing correctly to deal with any sensible load will take care of latent heat gains. My concern is sensible heat gain. I have read that upsizing the evaporator coil and blower capability over the needed condenser capacity can increase the sensible capacity or ratio of the system. Have you done this? Am I thinking correctly?

    jb

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,042
    While I like Rheem/Ruud heat pumps, now that 13 SEER is the baseline, they don't have a "high efficiency" heat pump at all. They only go up to 14 SEER in heat pumps.

    Mid-grade to high end Trane/American Standard equipment is always nice, though it can be pricey.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    168
    Wyounger,
    I have noticed that about Rheem/Ruud heat pumps also. As you mentioned, with 13 SEER as the base, I would bet they introduce higher SEER models in the near future-at least a 16.
    I worded my initial question to try and focus on the heat pump itself. It's design and durability. I know that most any brand with proper install and maintenance will perform, but there does seem to be a bit of consensus that Trane/AS has a bit of an edge in on the pump itself. Others might disagree. I am looking for an AC/heat pump that will last 20 years with proper maintenance in the adverse conditions of West Texas where heat and thus AC usage is significant. For me, durability is a little more important than controls for my application.
    Humidity is not our problem. To give Carrier it's place, the Infinity controls for the heat pumps staging of electric strips is nice. I am all-electric. I notice that Rheem/Ruud has what they call the Watt Restrictor on their air handler. I suppose that is their way of working that task.
    Thanks for your reply.

    jb

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