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Thread: condensation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    bridge facility
    Posts
    3
    hey guys i,m new here {great web site}.just wondering;is it ok to dump the condensation water from 90+ gas furnace into the sewer drain or should it be pumped out doors?i know some state have diffrent laws ,i'm in south jersey{don't hold that against me}is there an industry standard?.thanks guys!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,641
    have never had problems dumping furnace or humidifier in sewer. a/c units it depends on town. one thing you don't want to do is dump furnace into a copper drain line. i am in burlington county.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    1,145
    The only real concern with dumping condensate water from a condensing furnace is 'will the low Ph water solution harm the piping it flows into?' The Ph is on the acidic side and can harm copper quickly and eventually, cast iron. I feel we will see problems in years to come with some damaged underfloor drain piping materials. So long as the condensate is diluted with other waste water, the problems are minimized. If your drain piping is plastic, like PVC or ABS, you should have no worries at all with this issue. I would be hesitant to dump it outside. First of all, as the water will freeze and the acidic levels could stain brick, concrete walkway, patio or whatever surface it drains onto. On the other hand, your Azaleas might love it, as I hear they like slightly acidic soil conditions!
    Don't confuse me with facts, my mind is already made up.

  4. #4
    gto boy Guest
    if you pump it outside it will freeze and flood basement or turn off heat.Sewer is best,septic system second,outside the last choice.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    For an expert answer to your question read this short article by one of our members.

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?threadid=48369

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, and Califormia
    Posts
    318

    Confused

    I disagree. I have had several customers whose condensate lines were attatched to the sewer line. Eventually every one of them required a service call because the sewer line stopped up, pressurized, and pushed sewage, rotten food, and cooking byproducts through the trap and into the air handler/furnace.
    Aside from filling your house with a disgusting smell, the potential exists for fire (cooking oil/grease coating the heat exchanger). In the 5 states I have worked, it's against code for the condensate line to be run into the sewer. A properly sloped condensate line @ the end of a condensate pump will prevent freezing. Or run it into the sump if the unit is in a basement.
    "Surprised ?! If I woke up tomorrow with my head sewn to the carpet, I wouldn't be more surprised."
    Clark Griswold

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,641
    Originally posted by lra
    I disagree. I have had several customers whose condensate lines were attatched to the sewer line. Eventually every one of them required a service call because the sewer line stopped up, pressurized, and pushed sewage, rotten food, and cooking byproducts through the trap and into the air handler/furnace.
    Aside from filling your house with a disgusting smell, the potential exists for fire (cooking oil/grease coating the heat exchanger). In the 5 states I have worked, it's against code for the condensate line to be run into the sewer. A properly sloped condensate line @ the end of a condensate pump will prevent freezing. Or run it into the sump if the unit is in a basement.

    would take a total moron to tie a condensate line from a furnace or air handler directly into sewer line. most of the time when we go into sewer we are going in alongside of washing machine with discharge from condensate pump. no way this could harm unit.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    if they allow it or not there are a couple factors.

    One, supposed to be an indirect connection so an air gap, a trap with TSP.

    Some places get as extreme as requiring a ph kit on it to neutralize the acid

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