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  1. #1

    Add baseboards and add zone, is this a good plan?

    Our existing CI baseboard one zone water heating system is not enough now. Because we are starting finish the basement and planning to replace the family room’s electric heating with water heating. The boiler is 2yrs old Burnham alp105 gas boiler and supposes it is big enough for the coming new baseboards.

    We are planning to do the following:

    1. Split two bedrooms out from the existing zone, add the family room, which is using electric heating now, into the existing zone;

    2. Add one zone for those two bedrooms and another downstairs bedroom;

    I have two diagrams to show you what we have now and what the new design is. Please review it and let me know if my plan is reasonable.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Frederick, MD
    Posts
    920

    Have you

    done load calculations to see exactly how much radiation you need to put in those spaces?
    GO NAVY, BEAT ARMY!

    A DECADE OF DOMINANCE! +2

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by gregp View Post
    done load calculations to see exactly how much radiation you need to put in those spaces?
    Yes, I have done the heat loss calcualtion and I may need 30ft Slant Fin Line 30 baseboard for that family room.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    4,268
    your contractor should be able to size it and design it so it works properly. there are many variables when adding a zone or even just baseboard to a system. do you plan on doing the work yourself?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by housecarer View Post
    Our existing CI baseboard one zone water heating system is not enough now. Because we are starting finish the basement and planning to replace the family room’s electric heating with water heating. The boiler is 2yrs old Burnham alp105 gas boiler and supposes it is big enough for the coming new baseboards.

    We are planning to do the following:

    1. Split two bedrooms out from the existing zone, add the family room, which is using electric heating now, into the existing zone;

    2. Add one zone for those two bedrooms and another downstairs bedroom;

    I have two diagrams to show you what we have now and what the new design is. Please review it and let me know if my plan is reasonable.
    How high are your ceilings? Where are you located at? You need to do a heat loss calc for the entire home. Your boiler is a 105,000BTU input / 99750BTU output modulating boiler... depending on your location you should be fine. When adding zones you need to make sure that your supply manifold is sized properly. Boilers can be very..... difficult we'll say, to give you information without knowing all the variables.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    St Paul, minnesota
    Posts
    1,134
    I would recommend adding a 3 way mixing valve on the existing as ci and copper baseboards have 2 different heating ranges and if boiler doesn't have outdoor reset, then have it added.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,570
    The most important thing with modulating boilers is to have enough BB on each zone to load the boiler beyond its low fire rating. You do not want to cycle the boiler on a call for heat. One zone is normally better for the boiler.
    Aire Serv of SW Connecticut- Gas heat, dual fuel and central a/c systems installed and serviced

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,829
    Ask for opinions and that's what you get. Everybody's got one. But some of the things that are NOT opinions but are important:

    The heat loss from the house should be carefully done to determine both boiler size and Btu needs of each room.

    The flow rate of water through the system, as well as the water temperature will have a profound effect on the system heat and balance. This is determined by the piping losses and circulator/pump specified for the zone or loop.

    The Btu output of the radiation will determine how many feet of radiation can be tolerated on a single loop. This is determined by the supply water temperature, length of loop, Btu output of the radiation at that water temperature and temperature drop along the loop.

    The heating characteristics of cast iron and copper baseboard are entirely different and should not be put on the same zone. This is displayed by comparing the output of the heating elements at different temperatures, particularly at lower temperatures. You'll find that cast iron will produce usefull heat at much lower temps than copper, thus the calls for heat with cast iron will be less than for copper. Cast iron is a true radiant panel heat while aluminum finned copper is a convector and requires higher temps to drive the air movement needed to heat the room.

    Codes must be followed, including permitting, load analysis, fuel piping, venting, piping insulation, any other state or local codes applicable.

    Opinions will come into play in determining a proper boiler model, how the piping is to be done, how many zones, how the zones are distributed, what control strategy is to be used.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

    If you are waiting for the 'other guy' to change first, just remember, you're the 'other guy's' other guy. To continue to expect real change when you keep acting the same way as always, is folly. Won't happen. Real change will only happen when a majority of the people change the way they vote!

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