Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 28

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Cool Are the dyes UV leak detectors good and which brandname is the best?

    I´ve read a lot about this A/C findind leaks methods but I haven´t tried anyone yet.
    What do you recommend on this issue please? is this method good?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,583
    I've been doing service in this field, for over thirty years. I'ved never used a dye in a system and never will. However, I've seen plenty of systems messed up from the dyes, and still leaking

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    91
    i've never seen a system messed up from dye. Not saying it doesn't happen but i have never seen it. We do use dye. I personally try not to, but sometimes it is a good alternative. I carry the yellow jacket plunger type dye on my truck and have had success with it in the past. I don't believe it is the best way to leak check but when you have tried everything else it's a good alternative in my opinoin.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    521
    ALL dyes are not bad. Just like how mixing new refrigerants with old mineral oils can cause lack of lubrication problems, using the proper dye for a certain type of system is very important. We are talking about chemical reactions with both.

    You first want to ensure you are not voiding a manufacturer warranty, then ensure you obtain the proper dye suitable for both the refrigerant and lubricant type. Then ensure you have an applicator that will not fail, even when not under pressure, an applicator that fails can be very messy. Know exactly how to apply the dye by asking others that have actually done it before attempting the job. This is ESPECIALLY true for applications under system pressure!

    My bag of leak detection tools contains, Ultrasonic, halide, several types and brands of electronic, big blue soap, several brands of dyes, and the most useful - my EYES. I have found at least as many leaks on systems by first looking for refrig oil and obvious faults such as sketchy welds, pinched tubing, bad or overtightened flares, rubthroughs, cracks, pickled evaporator coils, etc, than I have with any other method.
    You really should perfect your leakchecking skills with other types before jumping into the dye pool.

    Generally speaking, except for preventive maintenance applications, I try dye applications when other avenues have been exhausted. I have found many leaks over the years that escaped other means as the dye will indicate where the refrigerant has leaked even if it is not leaking at the time I am there.

    When applied before there is a leak, a regular inspection with a UV light will catch small leaks before the sight glass or lack of performance indicates there is a leak. It also shows you where to start before pressuring up a flat system with nitro, sometimes allowing you to bypass nitro until the leak has been repaired.

    I had a supervisor who took pride in never using a computer by the time he retired. Once he retired and was bored, he started using computers and now builds them from scratch. He proudly said "I have been working for "x" amount of years and have never used a computer and never will, those things cause all sorts of problems!".

    The moral of the story is that sometimes you have to look past the "bad reports" of something to find out it's attributes.

    As for brandnames, I think highly of Ritchie YellowJacket dyes, dye applicators and most of their other tools for that matter. However I am always looking for better tools no matter what type.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,327
    Great post, very informative! I still would never put dye in a system,but that's just my opinion.
    Make your expertise uniquely valuable.

    Make your influence uniquely far-reaching.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    521

    Hmm

    Quote Originally Posted by jimj View Post
    Great post, very informative! I still would never put dye in a system,but that's just my opinion.
    Even if you couldn't find the leak by any other means?
    I am not saying they are the best option, just that they are an option. When a customer is losing money from lost refrigerant and downtime, I will try anything that is reasonable to make him happy.
    Have you had bad experiences with dye?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,400
    Quote Originally Posted by koolkahuna

    Even if you couldn't find the leak by any other means?
    I am not saying they are the best option, just that they are an option. When a customer is losing money from lost refrigerant and downtime, I will try anything that is reasonable to make him happy.
    Have you had bad experiences with dye?
    Point is, unless there is no access to the piping, the leak can be found by other means.

    Dye is a lazy way out.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Central NJ Area
    Posts
    788
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    Point is, unless there is no access to the piping, the leak can be found by other means.


    Dye is a lazy way out.
    It may be the lazy way out but i can be more cost effective because less labor is needed which is what is the major cost in leak location is.

    Now if the system is a R22, is 10 years or greater in age, the cost of location, repair, or replacement of a part, may not even be worth the time or effort. This is another story though

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,327
    I used dyetell in the early seventies ( don't tell anyone) and hated the red crap on everything. Today many manufactures recommend against it and as you say in your post there are a lots of other ways to find leaks, so far they have worked for me!
    Make your expertise uniquely valuable.

    Make your influence uniquely far-reaching.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    521
    Quote Originally Posted by jimj View Post
    I used dyetell in the early seventies ( don't tell anyone) and hated the red crap on everything. Today many manufactures recommend against it and as you say in your post there are a lots of other ways to find leaks, so far they have worked for me!
    I have run across a few of those red messes, your secret is safe with me.
    Like I said before, a guy needs to perfect and exhaust all other leak detecting skills before going with dye. I haven't had to use it for over 2 years now and hope I don't have to again.

    jpsmith1cms - keep up the good work!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Quote Originally Posted by jimj View Post
    Great post, very informative! I still would never put dye in a system,but that's just my opinion.
    So if presented with the challenge of leak searching a refrigeration system for an explosion proof HAZMAT vault where unstable VOC's are stored, how would you proceed?

    In this particular situation, attempting to walk into the vault with a heated diode type leak detector would likely get you tackled by a rather large man before you even got to the door, if it didn't get confiscated at the security checkpoint, and infrared sensor type detectors are set off by stuff stored in the vault.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    280
    not a dye but a self sealer ... A/C Leak Freeze

    they claim not to hurt the system and that it stays totally inert until it gets activated by a leak. has anyone used A/C Leak Freeze?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    280
    so is spectroline dye safe to use in an R-22 system? they claim it's compatible and has blessing of compressor mfg.

    normally would not put anything but refrigerant and oil into any system. have spent too much time already looking for this leak. dye will find it, but will it also destroy the system?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event