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  1. #14
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    Dec 2002
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    Houston,Tx.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jensen605 View Post
    So, are you saying that the duct work is OK? I have concerns, but that's why I came here... are they valid concerns? Or am I just being picky?
    No! you have every right to be concerned, no one, but no one, runs metal duct trunk line in a "home" like that. Maybe they thought they were on a commercial job,that they were supposed to be on, they got the commercial guys mixed up with the residential guys.
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  2. #15
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    Dec 2002
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    Houston,Tx.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    Do you have attic space?
    Again!
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    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

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  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    No! you have every right to be concerned, no one, but no one, runs metal duct trunk line in a "home" like that. Maybe they thought they were on a commercial job,that they were supposed to be on, they got the commercial guys mixed up with the residential guys.
    LOL
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  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    6,837
    A couple of thoughts to consider.

    First, the bathroom floor needs some tile repairs. Did he leave the old tiles or dispose of them? If the former, then before you get too excited, contact a home repair specialist or tiler and get a quote on the needed floor repair. Guessing at the repair cost isn't an advantageous position from which to bargain. If the latter, the cost could be considerably higher if the whole floor needs to be redone. Again, call in a professional tiler for a quote before trying to confront the HVAC company.

    As for the location of supply outlets, the main question is, does it work or not? Is that a fair statement? I think to try and maintain some semblance of willingness on your part (the high road, so to speak) you'll want to do two things. #1 is to make the installing company fully aware that you are suspicious about how the system will work during the hot weather of summer. Then if it performs satisfactorily, no harm, no foul. But if it's unduly uncomfortable, then you've got some legal room to challenge them, given that you informed them at the outset of your suspicions.

    Frankly, I'm surprised he even got the outlets above the doors. In our state, all doors have solid doubler headers above them, making them virtually unusable for supply outlets. Apparently your construction techniques are different in your area. I do think you're correct that the throw and drop from those registers is going to be woefully short of reaching the outside wall. Still, knowing that the most important part of the system is to have sufficient airflow to dehumidify the home and often the mixing is amazingly good, despite science to the contrary.

    As an approach to solve your immediate problem, I'd call and ask for the owner or manager and invite same to your house for a 'cup of coffee' so he/she can see the results and thereby know first hand of your concerns. I will say that we guarantee that if we damage property during an install, we'll put it back to at least its original condition before presenting a final bill. We have craftsmen who will make the repairs and if it's something major we've got liability insurance for that. We give the guarantee in writing but you know, some people just chase the lowest price and then are disappointed when the results are less than stellar. I trust that isn't the case here but approaching the issue(s) as matter of fact rather than from a point of adversary will go a long way toward arriving at an equitable and civil solution without the need for a third party, as in legal. Wish you good luck and let us know how it goes.
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  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
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    16,002
    If nothing else this belongs in the hall of shame.

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    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

    "Never let success go to your head, and never let failure go to your heart". - Unknown

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    If nothing else this belongs in the hall of shame.

    You mean thats not how you would do it at your house?
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  7. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Duct designs seem to vary by region of the country.

    By the photos you posted, it looks like the output may very well "sweep" the room, before circulating back to the return....in which case it may work fine.

    When I lived up north, the ducts were always put by the outside wall, typically by a window. But then again, most houses had basements too.

    In the south, where basements are scarce, ductwork is in the attic. Attic temperatures often reach the 140-150 degree range. So, standard practice here is to keep the duct runs as short as possible. Thus, the outlets are generally at the ceiling near the INTERIOR walls of a room, with three-way diffusers that propel the air across the ceiling toward the exterior walls to "sweep" the room and prevent drafts.

    What you got for upstairs ductwork isn't pristine or perfect, but having done many houses that have similar rooflines, I can see where they might have had to "make do".

    As to the bathroom floor, there simply is no excuse. You should insist that they fix it.

    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
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    16,002
    John, did you see the sheet metal running against the ceiling down the hallway? I might have seen it done this way, but there was usually a chase or fur-down covering it, this man will never sell his home with this like this.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

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  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Saint Augustine, Florida, United States
    Posts
    1,155
    Hold up before calling Mike Holmes, Holmes on Homes......How does the house feel? I hope the installers at least left you some of those tile to use to fix the floor. The fact that the installers had a hard time getting the duct work and registers where the sales team said that they will go doesn't alarm me. It is a disappointment/compromise that has to be made daily in this business.

    I would be curious how many cubic feet per minute you were promised/needed in each room and how many are being delivered. I am assuming that when you get in the attic space you will find that there is little to no room in that ceiling to run duct.

    I for one hope the house is more comfortable and your power bills are reasonable.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,675
    davemyers and crmont,

    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

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  11. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Saint Augustine, Florida, United States
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    1,155
    Quote Originally Posted by jimj View Post
    You mean thats not how you would do it at your house?
    that exposed duct is ugly as . I at first just focused on the registers.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
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    4,665
    I would call him to come pick up the check and discuss the issues with him and hold some money back until you are satisfied do not just mail in the check

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
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    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    John, did you see the sheet metal running against the ceiling down the hallway? I might have seen it done this way, but there was usually a chase or fur-down covering it, this man will never sell his home with this like this.
    I did see it in the closet, but not the hallway. Not condoning it, but I've seen worse. 2nd story houses that aren't true 2-story houses can be tough to retrofit.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

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