Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 18

Thread: R-717

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    398

    R-717

    Greetings everyone,

    I am in the process of taking a Refrigeration Mechanic Foundations course, and will be finishing up my level 1 in a couple of months. I am trying to decide whether I want to go commercial or industrial. I have some commercial reading material, I was wondering if anyone had information pdf's about industrial chillers that they would be willing to share.

    I have the ASHRAE handbook and Modern Refrigeration text book. I found the chapter on chillers in both books to be rather sparse.

    Thanks!
    Tim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Mixing oil and fire with a big spoon.
    Posts
    4,526
    what is your definition of 'commercial' and 'industrial'?
    "If you pull one more stunt like you just pulled with Tommy, you won't have to get on a plane because I will personally kick your ass from here to Korea!" - Best of the Best

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    398
    I see commercial as larger scale than residential, generally seen at retail outlets, malls, apartment blocks, hotels etc. Industrial would be more process refrigeration, large scale food processing (i.e turkey/chicken processing plant), cryogenics etc. When I think industrial, I think large screw compressors, ammonia,huge chillers, blast chillers, brine baths for rapid food cooling etc.

    Any information documents/pdf's about any aspect of commercial and industrial would be very much appreciated.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    665
    theres a recent post "chilled water books" with a whole lot of info , stan
    Keep it simple to keep it cool!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    La.
    Posts
    284
    The question that you need to ask yourself, is if you want to travel alot. If you want to do industrial refrigeration, you will travel within your geograpic area, as there usually is not that much of it in a certain area. There is a very good book on industrial refrigeration called industrial refrigeration, by Wilbert Stoecker. This is about cold storage facilities, and recirculated ammonia. This type of system is always a built up system and not a packaged chiller. The book is not cheap, you will pay over $100 for it. This is not a PDF that you can download. Good luck in your choice and remember that ammonia is not for everyone.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    398
    Quote Originally Posted by spinning wheel View Post
    The question that you need to ask yourself, is if you want to travel alot. If you want to do industrial refrigeration, you will travel within your geograpic area, as there usually is not that much of it in a certain area. There is a very good book on industrial refrigeration called industrial refrigeration, by Wilbert Stoecker. This is about cold storage facilities, and recirculated ammonia. This type of system is always a built up system and not a packaged chiller. The book is not cheap, you will pay over $100 for it. This is not a PDF that you can download. Good luck in your choice and remember that ammonia is not for everyone.
    Thanks guys, I appreciate it. I am the type of person that wants to try pretty much everything within the scope of the field i'm in. I am not married to the idea that "Industrial is for me" by any means. I just like all the big machines, the vibrations, the noise, and the smell. Despite all of those attractions, I might hate it and want to try a different part of the field. Thanks for your input.

    Also, I see the travel as a plus. Get out and see some communities in the area I wouldn't normally visit. Thanks for the suggestion on the book. I'll add it to my amazon wishlist!

    http://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Ref...6728296&sr=8-1

    Some copies used for as little as $66. New is 78, free shipping I wish i'd known about this before, as my birthday was yesterday. I ended up getting a small cordless nut-driver instead, which is still a very nice gift mind you.

  7. #7
    I've worked my whole life as an Industrial Ammonia Refrigeration Technician currently at the plant I work at our Ammonia System holds 436,441 pounds of Ammonia. That would be a good "definition" of Industrial. I love what I do, but like mentioned above Ammonia isn't for everyone. I'd say before you choose what "style" of Refrigeration work you go into, you really need to know what Ammonia smells like (And by no means am I telling or advising you to seek out Ammonia and sniff it, it will most likely cause you quite a bit of pain, but in order to know if its what you want to do with your life you need to know what it smells like and if Ammonia is somthing that you'll be confortable working around and with, and Googleing it wont work, its a smell that is very hard to describe) and it benifits and negatives of working with Ammonia. Please feel free to email me with any Ammonia questions that you may have. I've been working with Ammonia for a very long time, and hopefully I will be able to answer any questions you may have.

    Thanks
    -Chris

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,326
    you wanna be in homes with wives, dogs and cats, commercial spaces with pretty women, or processing plants with guys, making nice money, but often working a lot and smelling like...I cant describe it, you just have to smell it??

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    13
    I totaly agree with Nh3-Refrigeration-Tech's post!
    Please do some work experience with an Industrial refrigeration contracting company so you get a feel for it first as you may not handle the smell of ammonia for a 12 hour plus day the work can be very physical and the hours demanding but the job pays well and is very rewarding and it will provide endless opportunities to you

    I purchased a copy of Industrial refrigeration, by Wilbert Stoecker when I first started and I still go back to it all the time, it is an exellent book if you intend to enter the Industrial field.

    Good luck

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,833
    Flange
    I want do be a swimming pool repairman.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    A land down under
    Posts
    314
    Was a young fella when I last worked on NH3 but still clearly remember nothing like a good wiff to clear the head after a hard night.

    But seriously if you want a good grounding in mechanical refrigeration trade than you can't go past industrial work. You do actually build a tolerance to Ammonia the more you work with it. Agree with the above posts - Wilbert Stoecker will be your bible if you are an ammonia fridgee.
    Necessity is the mother of invention

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Wichita Ks
    Posts
    1,506
    Quote Originally Posted by supertek65 View Post
    Flange
    I want do be a swimming pool repairman.
    Nope that wont work, you will have too many callbacks.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    13
    Was a young fella when I last worked on NH3 but still clearly remember nothing like a good wiff to clear the head after a hard night.
    But seriously if you want a good grounding in mechanical refrigeration trade than you can't go past industrial work. You do actually build a tolerance to Ammonia the more you work with it. Agree with the above posts - Wilbert Stoecker will be your bible if you are an ammonia fridgee.[/QUOTE]

    Couldn't agree more with the grounding you will get from working for an industrial company, so many young guys today couldn't even tap a gasket out but if you work for an industrial company you will learn all those skills because at 11pm on a Saturday night nobody is going to sell you one!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event